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child custody Archives

Co-parenting with a difficult ex

81606621_S.jpgMany divorced and divorcing parents in Kansas are concerned about their children. They want to spend time with their kids while also recognizing that children benefit from having a strong relationship with both parents. However, there are situations in which effective co-parenting can be particularly challenging.

Is shared custody for everyone?

65215009_S.jpgAs a Kansas parent who is getting a divorce, do you already know how you will be handling matters of child custody? You may have heard that shared custody is largely considered to be the better option, but are there any downsides? And what do you do if it simply isn't the right choice for your family?

How can you relocate with your kids?

73219300_S.jpgYou might view the finalizing of your divorce agreement as the end of your proceedings. In reality, however, changes in both yours and your ex-spouse's individual circumstances could very require you to revisit your case once again. Say that you decide to move away from Wichita (either to take another job or to simply move on with your life far away from your ex-spouse). If you have or share custody of your children, you likely will want to take them with you. Yet how are you expected to handle a relocation in light of your custody agreement

When might the Kansas courts change a child's primary residence?

63161309_S.jpgIf you are like most divorcees, your situation today looks drastically different than it did when you first got divorced one, two or ten years ago. This means that your former court agreements, such as your Kansas child custody agreement, may no longer apply to your circumstances, and you may wish to seek a modification. Before you petition to modify a custody order, however, you must first understand why the state decided custody the way it did in the first place and when it will allow for a change.

Steps to positive co-parenting

20772705_S.jpgFor divorcing parents in Kansas, the thought of working collaboratively with their former partner can seem all but impossible. However, this is exactly what is needed in order to raise children after a divorce. A high level of consciousness is required in making this happen and that can include reminding oneself of some guidelines along the way.

Both parents arrested in custody dispute

67068002_S.jpgIt may be of little surprise that child custody proceedings in Wichita can become heated. The hope is that divorcing parents can put aside any negative feelings that they might have for each other and work together to come up with an amicable arrangement that truly is in their kids' best interests. However, given the emotion that parents feel towards their children, expecting them to remain agreeable when their time with their kids appears threatened may be unrealistic. However, both parents involved in a custody dispute will both realize that any rash actions they may take might ultimately only impact their own chances of securing a favorable ruling. 

How are a child's best interests determined?

10021021_S.jpgAs a parent in Kansas, you naturally want to do what is in your child's best interest in everything, including your divorce from your spouse and the child custody proceedings that result from it. However, in certain cases, the best interests of the child may be difficult to determine.

Mother and daughter disappear following custody hearing

48882687_S.jpgEven though the feelings that a married couple has for each other may change over time, the discord between them often may have no effect on how they feel for their children. This may explain why child custody disputes in Wichita can become so contentious. The hope may be that divorcing parents can put aside their differences and come to a custody agreement that is in the best interest of their children. However, the strong negative emotions sometimes felt between a separated couple may serve to convince both that their best interests reflect those of their kids, thus prompting them to hold out in their custody demands. 

The problem with being a "Disneyland Dad"

25320706_S.jpgThe common school of thought is that the cards are stacked against men when it comes to being awarded custody of their children during divorce proceedings. While this has often proven to be true historically, recent data suggests that this trend may be reversing. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the percentage of fathers who had custody of their kids rose from 16 percent in 1994 to 19.6 percent in 2016. Yet even with this increase, it seems that mothers might still be favored in custody proceedings. This may cause some men to become bitter and push them towards becoming "Disneyland Dads." 

Child custody disputes: getting over the obstacles

35143293_S.jpgIt can often be difficult to draw the line with parenting after divorce. With separation already causing a major divide in normal family life, the different ways parents regard childrearing can spark extra discord. Many Kansas families find it challenging to fit into a new groove of living, especially with children involved. Some strategies may help make a situation more manageable.

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